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Biochar Projects

1.0

The American Carbon Registry (ACR), a non-profit enterprise of Winrock International, has put the Methodology for Biochar Projects, developed by The Climate Trust, The Prasino Group, the International Biochar Initiative, and Carbon Consulting, in the inactive classification. 

The conclusion of the peer reviewers is that the methodology should not be accepted at this time. They stated that the scientific literature does not provide sufficient evidence of the stability of soil carbon sequestration in fields treated with biochar using H:Corg ratio correlations as cited in the International Biochar Initiative’s Standard Test Method for Estimating Biochar Carbon Stability (BC+100).

ACR welcomes the opportunity to revisit approval of the methodology at such time as there is clearer scientific consensus behind the approach proposed for methods to measure, monitor and verify biochar carbon stability.

Methodology background

Biochar is produced through the pyrolysis of biomass. The methodology quantifies and credits both the avoided emissions from combustion or decomposition of biomass in the baseline and enhanced carbon sequestration at sites where biochar is applied. In the baseline scenario, biochar feedstocks would be combusted or decompose, releasing carbon dioxide and/or methane. In the project scenario, pyrolysis physically and chemically transforms the feedstocks into a more recalcitrant form that can be applied to soil for long-term sequestration. Under this methodology, biochar may be produced from any biomass residues from forestry and agriculture, municipal solid wastes, and other biomass-based materials approved for use under the International Biochar Initiative’s IBI Biochar Standards (2013) provided such feedstocks also meet sustainability criteria specified in the methodology.

The conclusion of the peer reviewers is that the methodology should not be accepted at this time.  They felt the scientific literature did not provide sufficient evidence of the stability of soil carbon sequestration in fields treated with biochar using H:Corg ratio correlations as cited in the International Biochar Initiative’s Standard Test Method for Estimating Biochar Carbon Stability (BC+100).

ACR welcomes the opportunity to revisit approval of the methodology at such time as there is clearer scientific consensus behind the approach proposed for methods to measure, monitor and verify biochar carbon stability.

Process documentation

14. Agriculture, Forestry, Land Use
Contents
File PDF document Biochar v1.0 public comment draft
File PDF document Biochar public comments & responses
File PDF document Biochar Peer Review Comments & Responses
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